Photographing snowAs winter is already here are a few practical and technical tips about how photographing snow. First of all, in order to get some great photos of snow and mountain landscapes during the cold weather, you have to take great care about your camera and yourself. Preparation to shooting in cold winter is essential. Always dress warmly and protect yourself from sunburn at the highest altitudes. Use fingerless gloves for shooting. They keep your hand warm while you have full control of your camera. Your camera can malfunction while taking photos in extreme cold temperatures (below -20ºC). So, check your camera’s manual for all the suggested precautions to take. Also, cold weather might inhibit the normal performance of the battery inside your camera and though the energy level shows hall full it can be dead completely just a few minutes later.
So, always remember to bring an additional battery with you. Also, there is risk of condensation can form on your lenses simply by moving your camera from cold to a warm environment (mountain hut for example).

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The rule of thirdsThe rule of thirds applies to the process of composing photographs and helps you to shoot visually appealing and balanced images. How? Simply by dividing the image you’re going to shoot into thirds, horizontally and vertically, in order you get nine equal parts. By doing so you will have a grid. The points where horizontal and vertical lines intersect are called also points of interest or anchor points.

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desert photographyThe most significant rule in desert photography is: deserts need to be photographed in the early morning or late afternoon light. This because much of their detail and texture is subtle and can be lost if you take pictures when the sun is higher in the sky and consequently light is much stronger. The gentle light at sunrise and sunset may cause the desert to glow beautifully orange or red, and the low angle means that even a ripple in the sand will cast a small shadow, giving contrast and definition to your picture.

If you don’t have other choice than taking pictures in the heat of the day, then consider to shoot with the longest lens you have and try to photograph something a long way off that is distorted by heat haze. You may be able to photograph a shimmering mirage, where the heat haze resembles water. A powerful telephoto lens will exaggerate and magnify both of these phenomena.

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Shooting photo check listAs a professional photographer organizing photo workshops in Valencia, I must admit I have seen often participant photographers shooting photos of a given visited place (for example, a building or a cityscape) too quickly without checking view angle or composition first. This happened to me many times not only with beginner photographers but even with intermediate or advanced ones.

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food photographyWhen traveling food photography is a tasteful aspect for many photographers. In fact, food tells a lot about the country you are visiting and also it can be a useful way to know more about people and culture. Countries like Italy, India or China offer such a wide range of different and tasteful specialities that basically every city or region of these countries get their own traditional dishes and culinary style. Here are a few quick tips for taking some great images of food.

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