Think Tank Airport Essentials camera bagLast week, I received the Think Tank Photo Airport Essentials, the smallest camera backpack of Think Thank Photo’s Airport series. For two years, I have been using the Think Tank Photo Airport Commuter backpack for my travels and I have been extremely happy with that purchase. As I started looking recently for something a bit smaller to accomodate my equipment for short journeys or urban photography, my obvious choice fell on the smallest backpack of Airport series. Here’s my review on my latest camera bag purchase. The Airport Essentials backpack comes in the usual Think Tank Photo’s elegant black exterior design with minimal visible features and straps.

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Almost one year ago, my bright blue MeFoto GlobeTrotter carbon fiber tripod replaced my faithful Gitzo tripod which followed me during my travels all over the world and photo shoots for at least 5 years. I have been searching for a worthy replacement for a while. At the end, among all those available travel tripods, my choice fell on MeFoto GlobeTrotter's. First, because the many positive reviews about material quality and strength I read from other photographers on internet. Second,  for being also very competitively priced.

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Nymphenburg Palace, Munich, Bavaria, GermanyLocated just outside Munich and considered one of the tourist highlights of the Bavarian capital, the glorious baroque and rococo Nymphenburg Palace was one of my chosen destinations for shooting photos during a recent German trip. Particularly, I was interested in taking some photos of the magnificent Steinerner Saal, a great hall extending over two floors inside the palace and richly decorated with stucco and grandiose frescoes.

Having chosen the worst month for shooting photos for a professional photographer (August) with probably half of Europe’s tourists around me, I had to make sure to be there early in the morning right at the opening time of the palace and hope that very few tourists had the same idea.

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desert photographyThe most significant rule in desert photography is: deserts need to be photographed in the early morning or late afternoon light. This because much of their detail and texture is subtle and can be lost if you take pictures when the sun is higher in the sky and consequently light is much stronger. The gentle light at sunrise and sunset may cause the desert to glow beautifully orange or red, and the low angle means that even a ripple in the sand will cast a small shadow, giving contrast and definition to your picture.

If you don’t have other choice than taking pictures in the heat of the day, then consider to shoot with the longest lens you have and try to photograph something a long way off that is distorted by heat haze. You may be able to photograph a shimmering mirage, where the heat haze resembles water. A powerful telephoto lens will exaggerate and magnify both of these phenomena.

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